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School Times Should be Changed

Are students getting up too early?

Ashton Palmi, Staff

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Sierra Middle School students and teachers are getting up too early to go to school.

According to CNN reporters, teens need to get 9-10.5 hours of sleep each night, and most teens aren’t getting that because of the school schedule.

Parents have probably told you at least once to go to bed early. Even if you do, it’s rarely, actually helping you get into bed earlier.  When it is dark, your brain produces a chemical called melatonin. Melatonin is in your brain and helps you fall asleep faster. Before daylight savings it’s been dark when a majority wake up to leave for school. When we wake up and when it’s dark outside, our brain is still producing melatonin which causes us to be exhausted more often than we should be. In order to be fully awake and alert for our school day, we need to sleep in more, and wake up when the sun is out.

The National Sleep Foundation poll calculated that about 28% of adolescents have fallen asleep in class at one point or another in their school career. CNN anchors reported that 59% of middle schoolers are getting less sleep than recommended for their mental and physical health.

Sleep deprivation can give teens physical and mental problems, as well as a decline in school performance. A few examples of mental problems from lack of sleep are: ADD, increased stress, and decreased alertness by as much as 32%. Certain causes for physical issues include: obesity, strokes, heart failure and high blood pressure.  

If you don’t get enough sleep it can lead to a disease such as diabetes. Kids who get enough sleep do 40% better in school on tests and remembering facts. These kids also need sufficient sleep to cope with their busy lives filled with sports and extracurricular activities, summarized the AAP test. If the schools want us to continue participating in these events, they need to work with our sleep schedules as well.

“I hope this is a wake up call to school districts and parents all over this country,” said Lofgren. “With early school start times, some before 7:00 a.m., adolescents are not getting enough sleep”.

In order to remain successful in school, teens need to get the recommended amount of sleep to perform to their best ability.

 

 

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The student news site of Sierra Middle School
School Times Should be Changed